Policing The Police

Baltimore has a problem with cops and robbers — some of the cops are robbers, too. The latest scandal exposed officers acting like a gang, stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from citizens and keeping the cash. Former Baltimore police officer Michael Wood joins the conversation to talk crime and corruption in Charm City. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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Приве́т, 2018: Protecting America's Next Elections

U.S. intelligence leaders have warned that the Russians are already meddling in the upcoming midterms. Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told a congressional committee that Russia and other foreign entities were likely to attack U.S. and European elections this year; adding Moscow believes similar efforts successfully undermined U.S. democracy two years ago. Securing elections will take work from the government, Silicon Valley and citizens. What does that work look like? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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Steven Pinker Looks At The Bright Side

There are plenty of reasons to despair: increased partisanship, a warming planet, the Doomsday Clock’s recent tick closer to midnight. But Steven Pinker is one person making the argument that not only are times not as bad as they appear, but we’ve in fact, never had it quite so good. He even says he has the data that prove it. His new book “Enlightenment Now” makes the case that the world is improving, and that it can improve further if we embrace the right principles. What principles does he mean? Is he on to something or will he be left hugging those principles on his own this Valentine’s Day? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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#MeToo's Next Step

Where is the #metoo movement headed? In just the last few months, untold numbers of women have spoken up about sexual harassment at work. This profound cultural shift is raising some concerns about keeping abusers accountable and maintaining due process. Does #metoo have further to go — or does it sometimes go too far? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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The Courts Draw The Line For Gerrymandering

It’s easy to see when a legislative map is gerrymandered. But what should an improved map look like? Lawmakers in Pennsylvania are under a court order to figure that out and two U.S. Supreme Court cases could answer this question nationwide. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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How Astrology Hangs On

Astrology has been around for thousands of years, but it seems to be having a moment right now. Perhaps technology has a new generation looking to the sky charts. Whether it’s a source of comfort, entertainment or enlightenment, astrology is still bringing meaning to millions. Join us as we meet two professional astrologers and a reporter who covers it. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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Black Women's Political Power And The Savior Syndrome

America loves its superheroes. But in real life, some say black women bear great power — and an unfair amount of responsibility. Black women have been showing up for generations to confront everything from systemic racism to the gender pay gap. So how is the nation showing up for them? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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Can We Trust Polls?

Pollsters have gotten a lot wrong lately and, after the 2016 election, our trust in polling plummeted. So how does political polling work? And can you really trust any of it? We asked three professional poll-watchers and creators what they think. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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Why You Don't Hear Much About Sickle Cell Anymore

Sickle cell disease affects about 100,000 Americans — most of whom are black. Patients and their families say the search for treatments is slow, underfunded and ineffective. For the first time in decades, the FDA approved a new sickle cell drug, so why aren’t things getting better? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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Melania Trump, Trailblazer

Being First Lady is a job with no pay, no clear description and massive expectations. First Lady Melania Trump’s silence, compared with her predecessors, speaks volumes. But is anyone getting the right message? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Source: NPR national news
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